Carson City OKs new rules for business signs | nnbusinessview.com

Carson City OKs new rules for business signs

Anne Knowles
aknowles@nevadaappeal.com

Carson City businesses have new regulations to follow for temporary signage such as banners, flags, and A-frame boards.

The Board of Supervisors on Thursday adopted an ordinance amending municipal code covering temporary signs used by businesses throughout the city.

Now, businesses will be allowed one banner or flag attached to the their building, which can be displayed indefinitely. Previously, the banner or flag didn't have to be attached but could only be installed for a 30-day period, creating an enforcement headache for the city. The flags or banners can't be used in lieu of permanent signage, but a new business can use temporary signage alone for up to 60 days after opening its doors or for longer during construction.

A-frame signs must be within 20 feet of the business. Inflatable devices and freestanding signs can be used only temporarily with a special event permit.

The board started discussing changes to sign regulations in May, and in June the Planning Commission made its recommendation, which the board then worked on until coming up with the final ordinance.

In that time, a few businesses made public comment on the proposed changes, but on Thursday two new businesses came forward asking for more time to give more businesses an opportunity to comment.

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"At this point I don't understand what continuing it another 30 days is going to do. We've been talking about this for months," said Supervisor Brad Bonkowski. "We've put a lot of time, energy and thought into trying to do this right."

Both Supervisor Lori Bagwell and Mayor Bob Crowell said the ordinance can be revisited if any of its provisions prove to be a problem.

"It can always be tweaked, but it's an enforcement nightmare if we don't do something like this," said Crowell.

The board voted 4-1 to adopt the ordinance with Supervisor John Barrette, who said he's opposed to A-frame signs, voting no.

The supervisors accepted a $250,000 Land and Water Conservation Fund grant to purchase 206 acres south of the Timberline subdivision and Vicee Canyon for open space. The land, owned by Gerald and Luanna Hamm, was appraised at $501,000. The city matches the grant through the Quality of Life Open Space budget.

The property has several trails that will connect to the city's trail system on the west side. It's also a mule deer habitat, said Ann Bollinger, open space administrator.

The board approved a $114,071 contract with Kimley-Horn to design a roundabout at the intersection of Carson and Stewart streets as part of the South Carson Street redesign project.

Public Works had been considering four to five locations for a roundabout, did a traffic study, and determined Stewart Street was the best intersection. It has both the needed right-of-way to accommodate a roundabout and can act as sort of gateway to downtown, said Dan Stucky, city engineer.

The board approved the contract on a vote of 4-1. Bagwell voted no saying she thought the roundabout should have first gone to the Regional Transportation Commission, where the public would had more opportunity to comment.

The city did hold open houses and take public comment on the South Carson Street Complete Street Project, which included discussion of installing a roundabout somewhere on the road.

The board appointed Jean Perpich to a four-year term as public guardian. Deborah Marzoline retired on Aug. 3 and Adriana Fralick, interim deputy city manager, has been serving as the acting public guardian since.

The supervisors interviewed two applicants for a spot on the Planning Commission recently vacated by Candace Stowell, and appointed Alexander Dawers.